Serene Forest

Sunday, December 1, 2013

Triggers December 1, 2013



Hello All,

For many individuals with Periodic Paralysis, medications exist, which can be helpful to reduce or stop the symptoms and periods of weakness and paralysis. They are very lucky and can usually maintain a fairly normal life. But, the remainders of individuals suffer moderately to greatly with varying symptoms, muscle weakness and episodes of paralysis.

On a cellular level, triggered by things such as certain food or potassium wrongly enters the muscles or cannot exit the muscles either temporarily weakening or paralyzing the individual. These episodes, whether partial or full body attacks, may last hours or days and can be very serious and even life threatening. As discussed in previous posts, there can be dangerous heart arrhythmia, including long QT interval heartbeats (for those with Andersen-Tawil Syndrome), heart rate fluctuation, blood pressure fluctuation, choking, breathing difficulties and cessation, cardiac arrest and/or respiratory arrest. These symptoms accompany the episodes of possible full-body, total paralysis. Some individuals may not be able to open their eyes, speak or move in any way. The individual, despite these symptoms, will remain alert and will be able to hear. Due to these complications, it is extremely important to avoid the episodes.

For individuals with Periodic Paralysis there are many triggers, which set the partial and total paralysis into motion. It is important to discover these triggers because we need to stop the episodes, if possible, in order to regain the quality of our lives and to prevent the damage being done to our organs as the potassium shifts and depletes in our bodies. This damage can lead to permanent muscle weakness and disability. Other damage and complications may include kidney stones, osteoporosis, metabolic acidosis, lactic acidosis and/or exercise intolerance and more. 

The common triggers of Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

The triggers usually responsible for causing potassium to shift in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis are:

Eating a large amount of carbohydrates in a meal
Drinking alcohol
Ingesting too much salt
Vigorous exercise

The common triggers of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

The triggers usually responsible for causing potassium to shift in Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis are:

Eating a large amount of carbohydrates in a meal
Exercising
Getting cold
Ingesting too much potassium in food or medications
Stress (Good or bad)
Resting after exercise
Fatigue
Fasting


Other triggers for Periodic Paralysis

Triggers can include:

Diet:
Diet can be one of the biggest contributors to episodes of paralysis. The following are some of my offenders or those that have been reported to me or I have found in the research:
Simple carbohydrates: sugar, white flour, etc.
Complex carbohydrates: some grains, wheat, rye, etc.
Meat: mostly red meats
Salt
Caffeine
MSG
Alcohol
Large meals

 

Sleep:

Falling asleep
During sleep
Waking up

Stress:
Stress (Good)
Stress (Bad)

Sitting too long

Changes in the weather


Fatigue

Heat

Cold

Fasting

Dehydration

Exercise:
Some individuals have no problem with exercise but others may not be able to tolerate any type of exercise or very little exercise. This is called “exercise intolerance”. Episodes may develop soon after or the next day. Rest after exercise may set an episode into motion.

 

 Other:

 Electromagnetic Force (EMF’s)

Unknown: I can follow all the rules and still have episodes for unknown reasons.

Over-the-counter medications:
Most over the counter medications, etc can set muscle weakness or paralysis into motion for people with Periodic Paralysis. The following is a list of some compiled from my own known offenders, some that others have told me about, and some I found in my research.
Eye drops, Glycerin, Enemas, NSAIDs
 If the following ingredients are in any products you use…you should stop using them until you are sure they are not causing symptoms:

Sodium Hydroxide, Edetate Disodium, Stearic Acid

They may be in any of the following:
Lotions
Oils
Hair dyes or colors
Antiperspirants
Enemas
Suppositories
Soaps
Shampoos
Shaving creams, foams
Toothpastes
Deodorants

 

Beauty products

Skincare products
Cosmetic products
Bath Salts
Emollients, Ointments, Creams
Hair sprays
Perfumes, colognes
Powders
Hair gels, oils, tonics, mousse

Drugs:
Many, many drugs can set muscle weakness or paralysis into motion for people with Periodic Paralysis. The following is a list compiled from my own known offenders, some that others have mentioned to me and some I found in my research.

If one must take a drug, it is better to begin with ¼ of a normal dose to make sure it will work for you.

Saline Drips
Glucose Infusion: (If an IV is needed, Mannitol can be used
(or diluted solutions in extreme cases)
Oral or Intravenous Corticosteroids
Muscle Relaxers
Beta Blockers
Tranquilizers
Pain Killers (analgesics)
Antihistamines
Puffers for Asthma
Antibiotics
Cough Syrups
Eye Drops to Dilate Eyes
Contrast Dye for MRI’s
Lidocaine
Anesthetics
Epinepherine
Adrenaline


Medications that cause muscle paralysis:
 

A list of drugs, which can cause muscle paralysis, can be found at this site. Be sure to scroll down the page:
 

http://www.periodicparalysisnetwork.com/pdf/What%20are%20the%20Periodic%20Paralysis%20Triggers.pdf



 (For those who have Andersen-Tawil Syndrome there are special medication precautions due to the long QT interval issue and the possible risk of risk of torsades de pointes. The list of medications to avoid in these cases is at the end of this page.)





I need to note here that all of the web sites that I used to list drugs and medications that cause muscle weakness and paralysis have disappeared. I do not understand this. This is a serious issue for those of us with Periodic Paralysis. I am happy I saved the lists I found.


Until later…
 






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